These Are the Top Interior Design Trends for 2023, According to Experts

Expect to see restful interiors, bold hues, and eco-minded materials.

It wasn’t easy to transition back to pre-pandemic living—record-high gas prices, a housing market boom, and global uncertainty all slowed us down. However, this shift also caused many of us to seek solitude and rest in our daily lives. With most of our time spent indoors, cultivating a zen home became a top priority. And with 2023 fast approaching, design choices continue to encourage comfort and stability at home.

“With so much happening in the world today—often uncertain and stressful—I predict we’re going to see a shift towards balance, calm, and simplicity in terms of home design,” says Kathy Kuo, interior designer and founder of Kathy Kuo Home.

Ahead, designers forecast the top 2023 decorating trends.

1. Eco-Conscious Homes

In 2023, Kuo says consumers will design spaces that “feel in harmony with the natural world” while still being “super-chic and upscale.” Expect a pivot from synthetic materials, like acrylic, to organic, layered textures—a design trick that boosts serenity.

Kuo predicts an elevated approach to minimalism that combine simple silhouettes and natural materials, leading “consumers to seek out refined wovens like cane and earthy wood options like mango wood and oak.”

And as consumers and home experts advocate for greener homes, sustainable design will remain top of mind, encouraging renewable materials like wool, cotton, bamboo, linoleum, and cork across design elements like flooring, furniture, textiles, and building materials.

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David Land

David Land

2. Holistic Design

Corresponding with nods to nature, interior design that closely considers a homeowner’s mind and body is a growing category. “People are going to think more about how the interior design of a house makes them feel and, from there, dive into how design can make them happier, healthier, and more productive in their space,” says interior designer Leslie Banker of Leslie Banker & Co. This can range from how color affects mood to how lighting impacts daily productivity. The desire to dig deeper into the relationship between a home and the health and happiness of its inhabitants will dominate all design decisions in 2023, says Banker.

<p>John Bessler Photography</p>

3. Rich, Saturated Hues

Deep reds, browns, and greens will also take the spotlight in 2023. Meredith Ellis of Meredith Ellis Design predicts an uptick of red lacquer libraries coming in the future. “Some have been hesitant to incorporate red into their homes, but with everyone out and about again and traveling, I see people being bolder and more fearless in their selections,” she says. We’ve seen this prediction bloom already with Raspberry Blush, a cheerful red-orange shade chosen as Benjamin Moore’s pick for 2023 color of the year.

4. Right-Sizing

Older generations looking to right-size—moving or remodeling to suit their current lifestyle—will continue to play an important role in interior design choices. Equipped with features that support large multigenerational families, these homes cater to “grandparents who are selling the home where they raised their family, moving closer to their children and creating a magnet house for their grandchildren,” says Kyle Lissack, president of Pinemar Inc., referring to this process as right-sizing versus downsizing. These homes are designed to aid family gatherings and entertainment, with features like indoor pools and bowling alleys in combination with high-end finishes, says Lissack.

Paul Costello

Paul Costello

5. Multi-Purpose Interiors

In 2023, rooms must serve multiple functions. Alexandra Aquadro of AGA Interior Design emphasizes the importance of developing flexible interiors wisely and purposefully. “A kitchen isn’t just a kitchen; it’s a place for entertaining” and a homework station on weekdays. For this reason, multi-use areas are increasingly in demand, says Aquadro, whose Boston studio triples as a design office, a pop-up, and an events space. “It’s great to see what our interiors can do for us and our lifestyles,” Aquadro says.

Kim Cornelison

Kim Cornelison

6. At-Home Oases

Consumers will also look to their spaces to create a vacation-like retreat. Expect a turn away from the white and monochromatic “for a scheme that evokes wanderlust and a sense of escape,” says Scott Sanders of Scott Sanders LLC. As many resume traveling post-pandemic, homeowners are bringing specific pieces from their travels back home with them, says Sanders. “People are eager to have homes that speak of them and their experiences rather than muted and minimal designs of the past,” he says.